augh

hatefuckthecrowdwithmagic:

tunnelsnake:

LOOK AT THIS ELEPHANT BOOPING A GIRAFFE

it is the east! and Juliet is the sun


killbenedictcumberbatch:

Laverne Cox and Lupita N’yongo literally have inspired so many trans women and black women and have done so much to encourage them and meanwhile they are less influential than an ugly oatmeal reptilian alien and a manchild who wrote a scene where two pretentious terminally ill teenagers make out at the Anne Frank Memorial


There’s a chore list in the house again and I got folding laundry because I’m apparently the best at folding clothes, but I can’t tell most of their clothes apart, so that’s weird.


illusionarylunatic:

vorhersagen:

funkybug:

e-cis:

gladimon:

theotherally:

jackblank:

watershiphobbits:

ho-ho-my-lad:

feministmagicalgirl:

thecaracoburn:

drbrucebananer:

bluandorange:

spaceconfessional:

wienermeister:

timemagazine:

Beyonce, Robert Redford, Mary Barra and Jason Collins cover the new issue of TIME for the TIME 100. Photo: Paola Kudacki 

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

okay im pretty pissed about it too but

the next time 100 also has a chance for her, most likely

calm yourselves people-

More people voted for her to be on this one than voted for Benedict Cumberbatch, Amy Adams, Seth Myers, Robert Redford, in fact, you know what?  MOST OF THE REST OF THE FOLKS IN THE MEDIA CATEGORY, both in terms of total Yes votes and ratio of Yes votes to No votes.

There is actually quite literally no excuse for her to not be in the top 100 except that the people making the list are complete and utter transphobic garbage.


cruciothatbitch:

kenway:

watch at least the first minute of this

i did not want this video to end


5 Autism Simulations to Help You Experience Sensory Overload

queensimia:

aspergyaru:

THIS. YES. 

Please don’t watch some of these if you are prone to seizures or are already feeling melty.

Really helpful for those of us who learn best by demonstration.


234 Female Students Went Missing in Nigeria, and the Media Has Barely Covered It

catbountry:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

The news: South Korea’s tragic ferry disaster has gripped international headlines for the past week as the world watched with bated breath to find out what happened. Though 159 bodies have been discovered by divers, another 143 still remain missing — and families and loved ones are hoping against hope that they are somehow still alive.

But on the other side of the world, 234 schoolgirls in Nigeria, ages 16 to 18, wereabducted two days before the South Korean incident. Armed men broke into a school in the northeastern city of Chibok, shot the guards and took the girls away while they were taking a physics exam. The attack has been linked to Boko Haram, a jihadist affiliate of al-Qaida.

So why haven’t we heard about it? Simply put, because the world has very different views on South Korea and Nigeria. One is among the richest countries in the world and a powerful Western ally with a high quality of life and strong international presence. The other is in Africa, where, you know, these things happen all the time — or so we’re led to believe.

"In Nigeria, the mass abduction of schoolgirls isn’t shocking," CNN claims. “No one knows where the missing girls are. And even more surprising, no one’s particularly shocked.”

Image Credit: Al-Jazeera

But that’s not true. Boko Haram, which is Hausa for “Western education is sinful,” is against the education of girls. Girls have been abducted in the past to serve as cooks or sex slaves — but a kidnapping of this size is unprecedented.

And despite what CNN might think, people aren’t simply giving up on the girls. Desperate family members and town residents have gone on the search, combing the Sambisa Forest, a known terrorist hangout, on motorcycles. The search parties have so far had some success, uncovering traces of the girls.

The government is not helping. According to the school, about 43 girls have already escaped their captors — no thanks to the authorities. ”None of these girls were rescued by the military; they managed to escape on their own from their abductors,” said schoolmaster Asabe Kwambura.

As recently as Monday, education authorities claimed that only 85 girls have gone missing, despite the families’ insistence that 234 were taken. The military even claimed at one point that they rescued all but eight girls — which they immediately retracted the following day.

Nigerian security officials insist they are in ”hot pursuit” of the abductors, but they’ve yet to find a single girl. ”It’s alarming that more than a week after these girls were abducted, there are not any concrete steps to get them back,” said Human Rights Watch’s Nigeria researcher Mausi Segun.

It’s a dangerous environment. Boko Haram has been on a rampage in recent months and on the same day as the girls’ abduction, the group claimed responsibility for a bombing in Abuja that killed 75. The terrorist group, which wants to establish an extremist Islamist state in northeastern Nigeria, has alreadykilled over 1,500 people this year.

But that does not mean we should look the other way when a tragedy like this takes place.

"The South Korean story has unfolded on camera, in a first-world country with every facility for news reporting. In contrast, the young Nigerians have vanished into the darkness of a dangerous world," Ann Perkins writes in the Guardian. "Nigeria is complex and messy and unfamiliar. It is easy to feel that what happens there is not real in the way that what happens on camera in South Korea is real."

The ugly truth is that when young lives are similarly at stake, we are more shocked when the danger takes place in a country that is considered stable and affluent — and less so in a country where violent insurgents are trying to take over.

But the media has a responsibility to report the truth rather than ignoring a story because it sounds familiar. It’s easy to become desensitized to stories coming out of a conflict-ridden region, but that doesn’t mean these human lives are worth any less.

Source: Eileen Shim for Policy Mic

Holy shit.


stunningpicture:

Me (located in Iceland) and my friend (located in New Zealand) made the biggest sandwich of all time.


sugarand-guilt:

dracubop:

danofthetubes:

anemia:

damianoisfamous:

excadrill:

the look


So the internet just gave my tumblr name a whole new (literal) meaning. I was alerted to a photo of me gathering massive attention via a friend who linked me to a Reddit post titled “Don’t worry guys, I’m taking hipster to the next level.”

Apparently some guy on the train uploaded this photo to twitter it has been spreading like wildfire since. Surprisingly when I read the thread on Reddit a lot of it was positive/supportive. I’m surprised by how unfazed and genuinely funny I find the negative comments. People’s theories as to why I am dressed like this, and who I really am are also really interesting. 

I’m dressed like this for a number reasons. Firstly, and fore-mostly, I genuinely like the clothes I am wearing. I’ve described my look as “anywhere from hipster chic to kawaii gangsta Harajuku princess”. This is the epitome of the latter. I love sailor moon, I love pink, those converse are kawaii as fuck and yeah fuck you I’m wearing Prada sunglasses. I don’t really dress like this all the time, but I wish I did more often. I mostly don’t because I want to keep the look fresh. I wore this outfit because I had an art exhibition at my college and wanted to express myself.

I also find men’s fashion extremely limiting in both types of clothes, cuts of clothes and colours. Women have so many beautiful options. So I pillage their aisles a lot because I wanna look pretty.

This was also a statement. As an artist I think fashion is incredibly important. This day, I wanted something that not only reflected my personality and artistic sensibilities but also have some social commentary. A lot of my work, or what I want my work to speak about, is sex and sexuality and notions of gender and gender roles. How many of you knew pink actually use to be associated with boys, not girls? Personally I think the idea of “This is a boy colour”, “This is a girl colour” or “Barbies are for girls”, “Power Rangers are for boys” is dumb as fuck. Creating social and cultural boundaries does nothing but limit the potential of a person. By dressing like this I am breaking that boundary for myself and attempting to reflect that sentiment.  

an inspiration

Keeps getting better. Rock on, man.

I HAVE THAT SWEATSHIRT LOL.

embrace this


pridefulvanity:

next time someone tells you Muslim countries oppress women, let them know Pakistan, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Turkey, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, and Senegal have all had female Presidents or Prime Ministers and 1/3rd of Egypt’s parliament is female but the US has yet to even have a female vice president and can’t say “vagina” when discussing female reproductive rights


fuckyourracism:

sugoi-rudeboi:

jelizabeth41:

lyriciss:

petitfemmenoir:

THIS IS NOT NEWS

I don’t know what people expect Egyptians to be. I guess watching The 10 Commandments on ABC growing up got folks thinking they all looked like bronzed white people.

👆👆👆👆👆

BREAKING NEWS: BLACK PEOPLE ARE BLACK. THIS IS AN AMAZING DISCOVERY. BLACK PEOPLE EXISTED BEFORE WE DISCOVERED THEM AND ENSLAVED THEM AND FUCKED UP THEIR LAND. WOW.

Africans in Africa? Mind blown. 


odlaws:

6teen redesigns? or 6teen college au?? who knows



the-goat-barn:

cornbread always has to over dramatic when she is jumping… source: the-goat-barn.tumblr.com



“After high school you realize you were only friends with some people because you saw them five times a week.” — (via rumour)


norsegays:

astrolope:

People being angry about ~dem gays~ on Target’s Facebook.

I just want to give my two cents on this and tell you a story.

A couple weeks ago, I was hired at Target. I have a job at Target. Not a big deal right?

It is a big deal because i’m a transman

It doesn’t take a genius to conclude that it’s hard for me, my brothers, and sisters to get a job. There are legal restraints regarding the job and if you don’t pass, it’s hard to be taken seriously at a job interview.

Right on the application, it asks what your preferred name is. It also asks if there is anything that target should know. I put the fact that I am a transman, expecting not to get a call because usually when you put that down, people will throw out the application. I got TWO interviews.

At the interview, they asked me about it. I told them I am on hormones and they told me that they didn’t care. Not in the sense that they don’t emotionally care, but that it didn’t matter. I was male and that’s all that mattered. They also told me that they give sex same couples benefits in states that do not recognize them as a married couple.

At my job orientation, I was not misgendered once. Even my supervisors who weren’t sure of my gender avoided pronoun use, which I found only happens when you’ve had pronoun training. They gave me a name tag with my preferred name and didn’t ask questions. I felt safe and respected, which is huge for a trans* person.

TLDR: Target is amazing not just for the LGB, but also the T. Shop there for the rest of your life.